Vancouver voter turnout steady on plebiscite’s final day

Vancouver Courier

Voter turnout in the transportation and transit plebiscite continued to increase on the last day of voting Friday as a steady stream of voters dropped off their ballots at an Elections B.C. depot near Vancouver city hall.

Over two hours Friday morning, the Courier observed more than two dozen people hand in their envelopes at a plebiscite service centre inside the City Square shopping centre at 12th and Cambie. As of Wednesday, Elections B.C. reported it had screened 698,900 ballot packages, or 44.7 per cent, of more than 1.56 million mailed to registered voters in Metro Vancouver since March 16. …

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Revenue drops, costs rise at Burnaby incinerator

Vancouver Sun

Metro Vancouver has been losing revenue at its Burnaby incinerator for the past five years but continues to promote waste-to-energy as a more cost-effective alternative to landfills to handle the region’s trash.

A staff report suggests revenue at the plant halved between 2010 and 2014, to $5.4 million from $11 million. At the same time, the cost of running the facility almost doubled, from $33.30 per tonne in 2010 to $60.53 last year. …

“The rejection of Bylaw 280 was a very regressive step that is bound to result in the continuation of waste flow outside the region,” said Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie, chairman of Metro’s waste committee.

Brodie acknowledged it “will be hard to replace those revenues in the near future” he expects the situation should improve as the regional district brings its costs under control. …

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Council throws out weekly garbage pick ups

Richmond News

A new bi-weekly garbage collection with a startup cost of $2.6 million was given the green light by Richmond City Council Monday. …

The city’s goal is 80 per cent waste diversion by 2020. Right now it stands at 71 per cent.

“To get to 80 per cent is an incredible leap. It’s very difficult because all the low hanging fruit is gone; the efficiencies are taken up,” stated Malcolm Brodie. …

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Richmond retreats from a proposal to limit Chinese-language signs

The Globe and Mail

Let us congratulate Mayor Malcolm Brodie and the Richmond, B.C., City Council on deciding not to dive into the vortex of cultural and linguistic politics.

They have not yielded to the calls from some citizens (going as far back as the 1990s) for limits on the use of Chinese characters on commercial signs. Such a bylaw would surely not pass muster with the Charter of Rights.

Instead, city officials are going to gently encourage shopkeepers to use English as well as Chinese signs, and to “de-clutter” unregulated leaflets, banners and other bric-à-brac in or around their store windows and premises. Just so long as they don’t try to regulate the language of signs. …

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Richmond votes to not pursue English-only signs bylaw

Vancouver Sun

The City of Richmond has voted unanimously to not pursue a controversial bylaw involving Chinese-only signs.

Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie said Monday night that instead of imposing language requirements involving signage, the city will look into updating sign bylaws to include a decluttering initiative. This would limit the percentage of window space that can be used for signs or posters.

“What it implies is that if you have a store window, only a percentage can be covered with promotional material,” said Brodie, but added that any bylaw amendment would not be language-related and would pertain to all signs, both in English and Chinese. …

Richmond moves to bi-weekly trash pickup

Richmond Review

A shift to bi-weekly garbage pickup, approved by council Monday, is needed to meet Richmond’s waste reduction goals, the mayor said Monday.

“There is no question that it’s a matter of duty. If we want to call ourselves sustainable, this is the route that we have to go,” said Malcolm Brodie.

Residents with city garbage pickup diverted 71 per cent of waste from the landfill last year. Richmond’s goal is 80 per cent by 2020. That, said Brodie, is “an incredible leap.”

“It’s very difficult because all the low hanging fruit is gone,” he said. “This is the kind of program we need to get to that 80 per cent.” …

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Richmond won’t pursue bylaw on English-only signs

CBC.ca

The City of Richmond has decided to steer clear of the controversial debate on Chinese-only signs and won’t be pursuing a bylaw requiring English-only signage.

“There will be no language bylaw that’s going to be invoked,” said Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie after a council meeting on Monday.

Council instead want staff to look into the merits of a de-cluttering initiative that would limit the potential percentage of window space that can be used for Chinese-language signs or posters. …

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Rink upgrades aim to boost energy efficiency

Richmond Review

The city recently completed extensive mechanical upgrades at Richmond Ice Centre to its ice plant and hot water infrastructure to modernize the systems and increase energy efficiency.

The $170,000 upgrade reduces consumption of natural gas to an estimated tune of $40,000 each year. FortisBC contributed $83,000 to the project, resulting in a project payback of just over two years.

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Up to 90 per cent of Burrard Inlet oil spill would reach shoreline in hours: report

Vancouver Sun

Metro Vancouver will send a letter to the National Energy Board stating its concerns about the potential effects of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on the region’s assets, infrastructure and environment.

The move coincided with the release of an independent oil spill study that suggests up to 90 per cent of the oil from a major oil tanker spill in the Burrard Inlet would reach the shoreline within 48 hours. …

“If you look to the future and try to see what this province is going to look like in 10 years you only have to look to the Massey Bridge to realize industrialization on the Fraser River is going to be much increased over the coming years,” Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie said. “This has to be far wider (issue) than the Burrard Inlet because we have our own set of issues whether its LNG or jet fuel coming up and down that river in vast quantities.” …

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Up to 90 per cent of Burrard Inlet oil spill would reach shoreline in hours: report

Vancouver Sun

Metro Vancouver will send a letter to the National Energy Board stating its concerns about the potential effects of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on the region’s assets, infrastructure and environment.

The move coincided with the release of an independent oil spill study that suggests up to 90 per cent of the oil from a major oil tanker spill in the Burrard Inlet would reach the shoreline within 48 hours. …

“If you look to the future and try to see what this province is going to look like in 10 years you only have to look to the Massey Bridge to realize industrialization on the Fraser River is going to be much increased over the coming years,” Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie said. “This has to be far wider (issue) than the Burrard Inlet because we have our own set of issues whether its LNG or jet fuel coming up and down that river in vast quantities.” …

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