TransLink to replace diesel buses that made people feel ill

Vancouver Sun

Metro Vancouver directors have approved a request by TransLink to use $9.35 million from the federal gas tax fund to replace 62 defective diesel community shuttle buses that drivers complained were making them ill. …

Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie questioned what other projects would be affected, noting Metro has been given little information on TransLink’s capital plans.

“It’s always a matter of choice and priorities but we have no idea what these priorities are without any information on the background,” Brodie said. “They’re making this specific request. Surely there should be some level of disclosure other than the fact that we’ve got these terrible buses that have to be replaced.” …

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Is Vancouver real estate overvalued? Reports disagree

… Zero waste will be the watchword for successful 21st century businesses, say global experts who met yesterday at a conference hosted by Metro Vancouver. Among the topics: food waste. The cities of North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond and the Township of Langley are considering a resolution that calls for a federal tax incentive to help prevent food waste. Nearly 40 per cent of the food we produce in Canada is lost to landfills, costing Canada $31 billion in lost revenue, adding organic waste greenhouse gases (now at half that of the oil and gas industry) and preventing edible food from getting to those in need. “This is a timely measure,” said Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie. “Our proposal would help further address the problem of organic waste, save municipalities money and provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits.” …

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Jet fuel facility delay with new Liberal regime?

Richmond News

As the company representing a consortium of airlines gets ready to break ground on a jet fuel storage tank facility on the south arm of the Fraser River, near the Riverport Entertainment Complex, Richmond city council is hoping a new federal government applies the brakes.

“What we’re hoping for and what (the Liberals) have committed to at the all-candidates meetings, is to re-look at the environmental assessment,” said Mayor Malcolm Brodie, who is planning a meeting with new Liberal Member of Parliament Joe Peschisolido.

The new Steveston-Richmond East MP pledged to re-examine the jet fuel project and the Liberal Party of Canada, which rose to power in last week’s federal election, has promised to implement strong environmental regulations. …

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City cool on Steveston Channel port plans

Richmond News

More environmental concerns surrounding Port Metro Vancouver-led projects have emanated from Richmond City Hall.

This week, Lesley Douglas, the city’s manager of sustainability, told city council that environmental reviews led by the port (PMV) for some projects being proposed on federal land surrounding the Fraser River do not consider the City of Richmond’s bylaws or its future planning guidelines. Nor are there clear rules for consultation between the city and the port for small and medium sized developments. …

Mayor Malcolm Brodie said he would soon meet with new Liberal MP Joe Peschisolido, whose riding encompasses the Fraser River’s south arm.

Peschisolido has vowed to revamp environmental protection laws vis-a-vis the port. …

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Cities call for federal tax incentive to cut food waste

Food in Canada

A number of major Canadian cities have recently passed – or will be tabling in the coming days – resolutions in support of a federal tax incentive aimed at encouraging food producers and retailers to divert edible food from landfills to Canadian charities.

Cities that have passed or are tabling the motion include the City of North Vancouver, Burnaby, Township of Langley, Edmonton, Halifax, Richmond, Ottawa, Toronto and Calgary.

The resolution advances a proposal developed by the National Zero Waste Council (NZWC) that “urges the Government of Canada to implement tax incentives for food producers, suppliers and retailers to donate unsold edible food, thereby, reducing unnecessary food waste, decreasing disposal cost to municipalities, reducing the environmental impact of food waste and addressing the issue of hunger and poverty in our communities.”

“This is a timely measure,” says Malcolm Brodie, chair of the National Zero Waste Council and Mayor of Richmond, B.C. “Similar to fiscal incentives introduced in the United States and Spain, our proposal would help further address the problem of organic waste, save municipalities money and provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits.” …

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Cities call for federal tax incentive to slash food waste

PR Newswire

Canadian cities from coast to coast have recently passed or are tabling, in the coming days, resolutions in support of a federal tax incentive aimed at encouraging food producers and retailers to divert edible food from landfills to charities serving Canadian households.

The resolution advances a proposal developed by the National Zero Waste Council (NZWC) that “urges the Government of Canada to implement tax incentives for food producers, suppliers and retailers to donate unsold edible food, thereby, reducing unnecessary food waste, decreasing disposal cost to municipalities, reducing the environmental impact of food waste and addressing the issue of hunger and poverty in our communities.”

“This is a timely measure,” said Malcolm Brodie, Chair of the National Zero Waste Council and Mayor of Richmond, B.C. “Similar to fiscal incentives introduced in the United States and Spain, our proposal would help further address the problem of organic waste, save municipalities money and provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits.” …

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Vancouver-region mayors call for new approach to food waste

Globe and Mail

Vancouver-region mayors are at the forefront of a new proposal to use tax incentives to encourage food retailers, suppliers and retailers to donate unsold, edible food to low-income people in need of food in Canada’s cities.

The idea advanced by the National Zero Waste Council – a Metro Vancouver waste-reduction entity founded in 2013 and associated with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities – would be to reduce waste costs for cities while also addressing urban hunger.

But it hinges on convincing prime-minister-designate Justin Trudeau and his government to make the necessary tax changes. …

To help the make the case, Burnaby City Council passed a motion in support of the idea this week with other municipalities such as Richmond ready to take similar measures in support of the idea. “We’re in very early days,” said Malcolm Brodie, mayor of Richmond and chair of the waste council. Vancouver Councillor Andrea Reimer, the council lead on waste issues, was unavailable for comment on Tuesday. …

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What if companies that deliver to your door also came back to pick up the packaging?

The Province

The companies that sell you stuff online will eventually use their delivery systems to start picking up used stuff and packaging, as western countries move closer to zero-waste, “circular” economies.

People leasing the stuff they once bought — from clothing to electronics — is another idea on the horizon for some 500 Canadian and international waste-management specialists, as they prepare to meet Thursday at the Vancouver Convention Centre East for the annual Zero Waste Conference organized by the Metro Vancouver Regional District. …

Metro Vancouver has sponsored the annual conference for government and industry since 2011, said Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie, also Metro Vancouver’s zero waste committee chair.

European governments are generally further ahead than those in North America, Brodie said, though Greater Vancouver is currently diverting more than 60 per cent of its waste from landfills.

“It gets better every year,” Brodie said, adding that changing consumer and business habits have helped toward that goal. He cited food consumption as an example — people buy more food than they use, and then waste the remainder.

“If we can persuade people that they want to have less food in the first place, we can make tremendous strides,” Brodie said. …

Liberal majority could mean changes for Richmond’s jet fuel pipeline project

News1130

Will a majority Liberal government alter the process of potentially getting a jet fuel pipeline built through Richmond?

Mayor Malcolm Brodie — who is against the proposal — says he went to a couple of all-candidates meetings during the election campaign, and it was clear the Liberal, NDP, and Green candidates all approached the project differently than the Conservatives.

He adds the Liberals in particular talked about their disappointment in the environmental assessment process. “And they indicated that they would take a long look at that to see whether the matter could be re-reviewed to make sure that the process had been reasonable and fair.”

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The Philippines Is Still Pissed Off That Canada Is Using It as a Giant Garbage Bin

Vice

Vancouver, a city known for its borderline self-righteous waste disposal policies, is being called out by the Philippines for essentially using the island nation as an enormous trash bin.

In 2013, the Ontario-based company Chronic Inc. sent 50 shipping containers, or 2,500 tons, of “plastic for recycling” to the Philippines, but closer inspection by that country’s Bureau of Customs revealed the bins were filled with regular old trash, including rotting food and adult diapers. …

Chronic Inc. owner Jim Makris has said he purchased the recyclables from a Vancouver firm. But earlier this week, Malcolm Brodie, chair of Metro Vancouver’s Zero Waste Committee, denied the city’s involvement in the literal mess.

“It sounds like it’s come from… Whitby, Ontario, where there’s a company called Ontario Chronic Inc. It may have gone through the Port of Vancouver but it’s not Metro Vancouver waste, for sure,” he told local talk radio station CKNW. …

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