Mandatory half English bus bench ads in Richmond won’t force commercial sign resurgence

AM 730

Malcolm Brodie says bus shelter ads will be regulated because it is on city property and is a contract between Richmond and a service provider.

“That’s quite a bit different from the previous situation which involved commercial signage and there were some specific Charter provisions that talked about the freedom of expression.”

The bylaw indicates that bus advertisements with a foreign language must include at least 50 per cent English. …

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Richmond, B.C., inks deal requiring bus-stop signs be at least half in English

CTV News

A Vancouver-area city where nearly half the residents identify as ethnically Chinese is requiring that all bus-stop ads be at least 50-per-cent English.

Richmond signed a contract earlier this year with advertising agency Pattison Outdoor, and it includes a provision ordering all foreign-language ads to be half in English in terms of space, font size, content and detail.

The contract came into effect on Aug. 1, about two years after the city backed down on a controversial proposal to impose the same English-language requirements on business signage.

Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie said the idea for language regulations at bus stops came out of those discussions.

“When it came time to renew the contract we inserted into the request for proposals and ultimately into the contract the provision that there had to be at least 50 per cent English on all the signage on the bus shelter,” he said in an interview. …

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B.C. city inks deal requiring foreign-language bus-stop ads be half in English

Metro News

A Vancouver-area city where nearly half the residents identify as ethnically Chinese is requiring that all bus-stop ads be at least 50-per-cent English.

Richmond signed a contract earlier this year with advertising agency Pattison Outdoor, and it includes a provision ordering all foreign-language ads to be half in English in terms of space, font size, content and detail.

The contract came into effect on Aug. 1, about two years after the city backed down on a controversial proposal to impose the same English-language requirements on business signage.

Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie said the idea for language regulations at bus stops came out of those discussions.

“When it came time to renew the contract we inserted into the request for proposals and ultimately into the contract the provision that there had to be at least 50 per cent English on all the signage on the bus shelter,” he said in an interview. …

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English mandatory on Richmond bus stop ads due to new contract

Metro News

Bus stop ads in Richmond must have a significant amount of English on them, according to a new contract between the city and an advertising agency.

The city’s contract with Pattison Outdoor, which came into effect Aug. 1, states advertising must be a minimum of “50 per cent English in terms of overall space, font size, content, and level of detail.” …

That’s because city staff already established an understanding with Pattison that ads be mostly in English, explained mayor Malcolm Brodie.

“We indicated our preference to the Pattison group who does the advertising that we wanted a major part of it to be English, a long time ago.”
The new contract simply formalizes that understanding, he said.

But the city probably won’t formalize its preference for business signs, said Brodie. Instead, staff are taking an educational approach. …

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Chinese bus-ted in Richmond: Now English language also required at city bus shelters, on benches

The Province

Richmond city council recently signed a contract with Pattison Outdoor Ltd. stipulating that any advertising with a foreign language at bus shelters and benches must have at least 50 per cent English.

“It seems to be reasonable to expect that as we want people to have signage on their businesses in English, we want to have it, too, in our bus shelters,” said Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie.

The new 20-year contract, which went into effect this month, is the latest development in an ongoing issue over signage in a city where half of its residents identify as ethnically Chinese. …

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Richmond’s social service agencies send S.O.S to city hall

Richmond News

… Beneath the shimmering skyline of new apartment buildings being fawned over, by those looking to get their foot in the door of Richmond’s highly speculative real estate market, rests a few remaining alleys and corners where Novacluse now sleeps, after becoming homeless about three years ago when he was crippled as a result of being hit by a car in two separate incidents.

… “I’m fully sympathetic to what you are saying, but what about the province? How much have you spoken to the province on these issues?” Mayor Malcolm Brodie asked Sugars, who replied that she and others have outlined their problems to local MLAs (Richmond Centre MLA Teresa Wat was unavailable for comment). …

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Activists find their ‘voice’ against Massey Tunnel replacement bridge

Richmond News

The only open house in Richmond to review documents for an environmental assessment of a planned $3.5 billion bridge to replace the George Massey Tunnel took place Tuesday afternoon at a local hotel.

Outside the relatively sparsely attended meeting — hosted by provincial government transportation planners and members of the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) — was Fraser Voices, a small group of protesters. …

Geoff Freer, executive project director, said regional growth of one million residents by 2040 means the bridge needs to be built.

He said the bridge is in line with regional growth and transportation plans, despite Mayor Malcolm Brodie stating otherwise. …

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Richmond’s mayor worried about possible protest at Massey Bridge open house

News 1130

Every day, you can see the line-ups stretching back from the Massey Tunnel along Highway 99, and road-weary commuters will get a chance to learn a little more about plans to replace it at an open house today in Richmond.

But not everyone will be praising the province’s predicted benefits as protesters plan to raise their concerns at the public meeting and the city is also forwarding a report outlining “significant gaps” in the planning process. “We have been speaking about this ever since the project was announced — we simply don’t have the level of detail and the justification needed for this massive project,” says Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie.

“We are concerned about the impacts on our local roads and we are certainly concerned about the impacts of tolling. It seems like traffic will be reduced down to current levels so it really begs the question as to why we are doing this project if all we end up with is a tolled facility handling today’s levels of traffic.” …

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